Michael Kracht

Michael works as business consultant at the Leverkusen office of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Cologne (IHK). There he advises and supports companies, freelancers and startups in all stages and challenges like seed-phase, growth, leadership, crisis or company succession.

Matthias Härchen

Mathias is Deputy Director and Head of Business Support of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry
of Cologne (IHK). After finishing his banking apprenticeship he studied the law. As a professional jurist
at the IHK, he advises and supports companies, freelancers and startups in all stages and challenges
like seed-phase, growth, leadership, crisis or company succession. In short terms: consultant – coach
– counselor.

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Kamil Barbarski

2079457Hi, my name is Kamil. I’m an entrepreneur, business designer and educator in the field of Lean Startup and Corporate Entrepreneurship. As the co-founder of MAK3it I connect startups and large organizations to build business models that solve real problems. My work includes workhops, coaching and speeches at established companies (e.g. Telekom, EnBW) , universities (e.g. University Tübingen Medical Department, RWTH Aachen) and startup hubs (e.g. Startplatz) as well as supporting the startup community by organizing the Lean Startup Cologne Meetup and beeing a mentor, speaker and co-organizer at Startup Weekend and Rheinland Pitch.

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Dr. Tobias Daniel Gantner, MD, MBA, LL. M.

tobiasgantner_hcfsHealth Care Futurists

Dr. Tobias Daniel Gantner, MD, MBA, LL. M. studied medicine, philosophy, economics and law in Germany, Switzerland, the PR of China and the USA. After his residency in transplant surgery, he worked with Siemens on international consulting mandates. His next positions included Novartis pharma strategy and head of health economics and outcomes research. At Bayer Healthcare, he built the department of Market Access from scratch. He is founder and CEO of the “HealthCare Futurists GmbH”, an international network and think tank from experts of diverse disciplines with a focus on medicine, health-care and life sciences. His interest goes out to disruptive innovations in the health-care system in systemic, political and technologic aspects and the change of business models rooted in it. He leads the „In-Algorithmo Diagnostics Group“, that is dealing with topics in predictive health-care rooted in big data and the inherent change of business models in the pharmaceutical industry as well as the revised approach towards patients and clients. Currently he is operating as Director Health Economics & Market Access at Janssen-Cilag. Tobias Gantner holds a number of teaching appointments in the fields of health-care management, management strategy, decision-theory, market access and Innovation in health-care. He is speaker in topics related to the future in health-care, medicine and life sciences. He is the at the core circle of the innovate.healthcare team and acts as moderator of the venue. Consult him for a transdisciplinary reality check of your challenge solution.

First Aid Smartphone Application

Background

First-Aid emergency situations are exceptionally stressful for most non-medically trained persons. On the other hand it is extremely important for the first-aider to follow precise and structured steps in order to give the highest possible chance of survival for the patient.

Problem

A whole new range of smartphone-based lifesaving technology is on the verge of entering the market. Through this technology we have the unique chance to boost the first-aid capabilities of the average non-medically trained user with the help of the smartphone.

Actual Challenge

The challenge is to leverage those capabilities that already come built-in with a state of the art smartphone in order to provide best possible support for the first-aider in case of an emergency. More precisely this aims at automatically generating all the necessary data to effectively call an ambulance and giving the paramedic all the information he needs in order to best prepare. Furthermore it is essential to give guidance and support to the first-aider in following the chain of survival until the ambulance arrives. An exceptionally well-thought-out concept would start with preemptive measures even before the accident.

Roles

Challenge Owner: Lars Wassermann

Team Captain: Lars Wassermann

 

Patient-centric Data Halo Integration (PDHI)

Background

To be able to maintain our high quality healthcare system, fundamental changes are needed. Citizens and patients must be empowered to manage their own health. Personal data of all types surrounds all of us like a halo. Today’s wireless, mobile devices, and “personal wear” devices are able to collect and transfer data surrounding patients, medical professionals, medical support personnel, devices, locations, and many, many more logically related entities. This data can be used to improve the “medical experience” of patients during and after physical discharge from the medical facility and should be applied to nurture them back to health while they are back at home. The patient must be responsible for their own health, influenced by knowledge elements related to their disease, and coached by digital medical professionals. Information and telecommunication technology will have a substantial role in this crucial (and cost-effective) transformation process from real-life medical professionals to digital medical professionals. Smart Phones and sensors are collecting data from citizens and patients on a level, never been seen before. It is expected that the Smart Watch technology will speed up this process even more.

It is therefore essential to have a trusted, dedicated medical platform that can collect, analyze, transfer, and integrate all these different data sources in real time with consent of the patient, medical professionals, and treatment-related organizations based on agreed disease-related and treatment protocols.

Problem

Patient-centric Data Halo Integration means monitoring patient behavior constantly, collect data, transfer this data to a unified, central platform, process and analyze the data, and create a feed-back loop to the patient and medical professionals to influence their actual behavior based on the data collected and related to the disease and/or unhealthy situation. But how to integrate this new technology into the user and/or patient behavior and everyday life?

Actual Challenge

How can the Smart Watch technology be used to support the patient at home? Design a PDHI system and build an app for collecting patient data at the source, based on “personal wear” devices, like Apple’s Watch, Samsung’s Smart Watch, and using Apple’s iBeacon sensor concept.
The PDHI system should:

  • grab the data at regular intervals,
  • transfer the data to a central platform,
  • combine the data with other data sources,
  • analyze the overall picture of the patient, and
  • decide on the next knowledge component to release to the patient, based on his disease, actual situation/behavior, and necessary next steps and/or corrections.

Roles

  • PDHI Team Captain
  • PDHI-Team (max. 5-10 consultants)

Earlier Identification of Late Presenters HIV

Background

The knowledge on HIV and AIDS a well as treatment options have made large progress since the 1980s. Still, 30 to 50% of all HIV infections in Germany are not diagnosed until they have reached a rather advanced stage. This carries enormous risks for both the patients and their partners. Frequently, “late presenters” are specifically those patients who, in their own perception and that of others, do not consider themselves at risk because they do not belong to the classical “risk groups”.

The reasons for diagnosing an HIV infection late are manifold and complex. Often, the patients delay seeing a doctor for fear of stigmatisation or as a result of poor access to health care. But physicians, too, tend to disregard the possibility of an HIV infection more often than not, and as a result do not perform the appropriate tests.

Problem

Early diagnosis of the infection provides benefits for patients, their partners and society as a whole. It not only facilitates treatment, it lowers mortality among infected patients as well as AIDS rates and the costs for society. And it reduces the risk of transmission. “Patients who know that they are infected behave differently. In addition, they get targeted treatment sooner.

Apart from that, treatment of “late presenters” is often very complex and carries an increased risk of side effects and [drug] interactions.

Actual Challenge

How may so-called “late presenters” with HIV be identified earlier, at the periphery and by general practicitioners (identification of hidden patients), thereby effecting their rapid referral to specialist centres (university hospitals) for treatment?

Roles

to be announced

Better clinical decision making

What should “smart” knowledge transfer/education in the field of depression look like to be able to guarantee enhanced treatment quality?

Background

Frequently, patients remain too long with general practitioners (family doctor) for treatment because:

  1. the number of specialists is low, with long waits at the specialists’ clinics being the result
  2. General Practitioners have to cover a broad range of diseases and cannot be “specialists” in each and every medical field. As a consequence, they often unconsciously underestimate the severity of a condition and do not give patients a speedy referral to a specialist. General practitioners are frequently not in a position to adequately interprete the condition’s symptoms, and the risk involved in failing to provide appropriate evidence-based treatment is being underestimated.

 

Quite often, general practitioners, specialists and therapists are not interconnected, hence exchange is not guaranteed.

Their day-to-day work leaves physicians little time for enhancing their knowledge in the various medical fields.

Problem

Quote: “ I can’t keep a specific tool for each and every medical field/disease from which to draw information “ or Just to stay up-do-date in internal medicine, physicians would have to read 17 original publications per day or at least one key publication per day“ (question of feasibility)

Actual Challenge

What kind of concept would succeed in providing general practitioners with adequate information to support them in their therapeutic decision-making?

While this solution must not take up too much of their time (simple medical education offers are not being used adequately), it must be so “smart” that physicians will use the offer/tool.

Roles

to be announced

Literature

Does GP training in depression care affect patient outcome? – A systematic review and meta-analysis

Customize Nexpaq

Background

Nexpaq is on the verge of turning the way you looked at a smartphone upside down. It is the swiss army knife you ever wanted for your smartphone but did not know where to get. Look no further.

Problem

We want to support Nexpaq going into the medical arena. It might be also interesting how high expectations especially in the medical arena lead to increased research activities in a number of companies.

Actual Challenge

NexPaq will provide a proprietary developer’s kit to everyone who has the eagerness to dig into the system and tries to come up with suitable solutions to use the technology, Nexpaq entails completely in medicine and patient treatment.  We are looking at dual source cameras that could be used in 3D photo taking for dermatologic usage. The light at the flashlight surely is enough to do an eye or ear exam properly.

Roles

to be announced

Options for therapeutic documentation

for care giving relatives, volunteers, GPs and others in care facilities

Background

Documentation in care giving settings is key. Without documentation, legal liability is unclear and reimbursement is subject to mistakes. Furthermore therapeutic success is the joint operation of all individuals that have part in the value chain.

Problem

They all interact with the patient and need some means of documenting their therapeutic interactions with the individual patient.

Actual Challenge

The Challenge is to create a simple infrastructure that makes documentation of simple and yet nonetheless important acts easy, transparent and quick. This will eventually result in better reimbursement for whoever is taking care of the patient and will thus result in a just distribution of money.

Roles

to be announced